Reading List: The Analects by Confucius

As part of my ongoing desire to learn and testimony to my thoroughgoing nerdiness, I have put together a list of almost 20 books that I hope to read this academic year. Here is the list so far, which is certainly open to change:

City of God
by Augustine
Monologium & Proslogium by Anselm
The Cloud of Unknowing
The Divine Comedy by Dante
Institutes of the Christian Religion by Jean Calvin
Pensees by Pascal
The Brothers Karamazov by Dostoyevskii
Orthodoxy by CK Chesterton
Dr Zhivago by Pasternak
Christian Letters to a Post Christian World by Dorothy Sayers
Madame Bovary
The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism by Max Weber
The Structure of Scientific Revolutions by Kuhn
The Art of War by Sun Tzu
Analects by Confucius
The Myth of Certainty by Daniel Taylor
Does God Exist by Kung

So I ventured yesterday to the bookstore to end the procrastination based on the notion that I would simply order the books online, and splurged to by some books new. This is just as well. My first read is Analects by Confucius.

As a philosopher, he has arguably had the largest single impact of any person in the world except Jesus. Without ever being schooled officially in Confucian thought, many East and Southeast Asian people are influenced by his principles. I hear people regularly refer to the legacy of Confucius and wonder how many have actually read what he said. And so I am taking the plunge to read him. So far as I have read, I myself may yet embrace his philosophy, insofar of course, as it does not conflict with my covenant with the Lord Jesus Christ.

I leave you with this, “If a man is correct in his own person, then there will be obedience without orders being given, but if he is not correct in his own person, there will not be obedience even though orders are given.” (XIII.6)

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3 thoughts on “Reading List: The Analects by Confucius

  1. Looks like a great list!

    Not sure if you’ve checked it out already, but one book I would recommend is KOREA Old and New: A History. I like it b/c it’s written by both American and Korean scholars and it’s fairly readable.

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