Eat the Cake

Courtesy of http://cdn.madamenoire.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/eat-the-cake-anna-mae.jpg
You know you want the cake!

There is a scene in the movie What’s Love Got to Do with It? where Ike tries to force Tina (Anna Mae is her ‘real’ name) to eat a piece of cake that she doesn’t want.  Here’s a quick run-down of  the scene courtesy of Hollie McNish of the Mirror:

Tina Turner, real name Anna Mae Bullock, has just released her own music single and two kids come up to her at a diner asking for her autograph. Not her husband Ike’s. Ike is jealous. He tells her to “eat the cake” so they can celebrate her new and independent success. She doesn’t want any. He says “Eat the cake, Anna Mae” and when she refuses, he stands up, shoves it in her mouth and across her face. Her friend and backing vocalist tries to stop him. Ike threatens her, beats her and she runs away shouting to Tina Turner, “You are dead if you stay with him.”

The scene has become iconic because of its vivid portrayal of the humiliation of domestic abuse.  (That the phrase has now become fodder for a Beyonce song is problematic in itself, which is McNish’s point, and beyond the scope of my current concern.)

Well, it seems we have now have progressed to a kind of ‘eat the cake’ scenario in American society. Well, more like bake the cake.  As everybody who pays attention to these kinds of things knows, there have been lawsuits about bakers who refuse, because of their tender Christian consciences, to bake cakes for same-sex nuptials.  There have been laws passed, vetoed, hysterics, etc. all around but for many it seems to be a totally irrelevant issue. After all it is just cake right?

Of course we are fortunate to have author and social commentator Rachel Evans to elucidate for us just the exact nature of the problem.  In a recent post, Walking the Second Mile: Jesus, Discrimination and ‘Religious Freedom’, she informs her readers and the listening public:

We have become known as a group of people who sees themselves perpetually under attack, perpetually victimized, and perpetually entitled, a group who, ironically, often responds to these imagined disadvantages by advancing legislation that restricts the civil liberties of other people.

Leaving for a moment any consideration of whether Evans can plausibly include herself in the ‘We’ of evangelicalism, we note that she advances this statement partially in relation to the supposed rally of evangelicals in favour of ‘injustices in Russia and Uganda’. ( Of course, it cannot possibly be that Russians and Ugandans have ideas of their own about how to order their societies; it must be because of ‘evangelicals’ that they have chosen to advance such legislation.)  More importantly though, and more central to her thesis is her suggestion that evangelicals are advancing legislation that restricts civil liberties of other people.

This statement betrays a lack of understanding of both the recent legislation and the very notion of what constitutes a ‘civil liberty’ – which doesn’t, last I checked, include the right to have someone bake you a cake.

But the heart of her argument is this:

As Christians, our most “deeply held religious belief” is that Jesus Christ died on the cross for sinful people, and that in imitation of that, we are called to love God, to love our neighbors, and to love even our enemies to the point of death.

So I think we can handle making pastries for gay people. 

Interesting.  But it isn’t just Evans that has this view. And it comes up whether we’re talking about insurance mandates under the Affordable Care Act, or Hobby Lobby, or Chik-Fil-A or whatever.   I have seen it elsewhere as people have likened the issue of meat sacrificed to idols in the New Testament, or of washing the feet in service to our neighbors, or of Jesus serving Judas who he knew was going to betray him, or, or, or…

Just eat bake the damn cake! It’s really not a big deal and I don’t understand why you’re making a big deal of it.

My thoughts on this turn rather to our forebears in the faith who lived in the sprawling multi-ethnic, multi-religious, multi-cultural empire of Rome.  An Empire that was actually quite tolerant of different religious and who had, because of the oddness of their customs, even created a carve-out for the Jews.  All that was required of a subject of Rome was a simple acknowledgment of the supremacy of Caesar.  The Romans did not ask you to forsake your religious worship, they did not ask you to stop your sacrifices to your own gods. In fact they did not even ask you to believe in the divinity of the Roman Emperor.  Heck most of them didn’t likely believe in it, least of all the emperors themselves!

They didn’t want or need your belief.  They needed your compliance.

And Christians, the ones who would go the extra mile, turn the other cheek, give water and food to their enemies, render to Caesar what was his, willingly, painfully, horrifically died rather than perform a simple, likely meaningless, ceremony.

Just like eating cake at a party.

What Evans is advocating is exactly what was portrayed in the film.  Anna Mae is perceived as being disrespectful because she doesn’t want to eat the cake.  It is taken by Ike to be a personal affront, something no ‘good woman’ would do.  If Anna Mae really wanted to serve and be like Jesus she would simply shut-up and eat the damn cake already! 

And  according to Evans if these objectors were really Christian they would just go ahead and bake it.  After all, isn’t that what Jesus would do?

At the end of the day it doesn’t matter whether the martyr dies for their faith or is merely driven out of business, or  shamed, or simply derided as an ignorant bigot – the substantive issue is the same and no amount of clever internet snark can change that.  Simply put, it isn’t about just baking pastries for gay people.  It isn’t just questioning whether to eat meat sacrificed to idols.  It is requiring people under force of law to supply goods for and participate in something they view as abhorrent and intrinsically immoral.

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My response to my Friends response to Rachel Held Evans response to Dave Ramsey (or reason No. 145 why RHE annoys me…)

My friend and former ministry colleague Grace Biskie recently penned an angry rant-y, hot-mess response to Dave Ramsey getting lambasted by Christians.  The lambastation (that’s not a word I know) first came to my attention via a link to something Rachel Held Evans wrote in response to a post Dave Ramsey had on his website.

(Edit:  Grace has made it clear that her post was not in response to RHE.  I’m not suggesting that it was…)

My reaction to the critique of Ramsey was not quite as rage-filled as Grace, but it was strong… very strong.  Grace writes of Dave Ramsey:

FOR GOD’S SAKE PEOPLE, he is NOTHING like Joel Olsteen and why I can’t think of any single comparison for the ENTIRE LAST YEAR that has offended me so terribly much.  And how I think the people who have made that comparison have very little experience with ACTUAL prosperity preachers or have had to sit and trenches with or disciple people trying to break free from the EVIL of prosperity preaching & false gospels in general. And how if they had, they WOULD NEVER compare a man like Dave Ramsey who FREE’S people from the bondage of poverty & bankruptcy compare those two…or Dave Ramsey to ANY prosperity preacher.  As someone who’s discipled countless students away from the bondage of prosperity preaching I am repulsed by this unhelpful comparison.  REPULSED.

I feel you.  I was pissed too, and not just because I personally have benefited from Ramsey’s principles (though I have) and not just because the critique lodged against him were shallow, uncharitable, and unfair (they were.  In fact her second line, “he makes his living telling other evangelical Christians how they can get rich, too.” is a flat-out lie, but anyway…).  It is because I think I ‘get’ Dave Ramsey and his ministry.  I ‘get’ his sarcastic humor.  Let me explain.

In a strange way Dave Ramsey is living the life I envisioned for myself.  He and I are both Tennesseans.  We both went to the University of Tennessee Knoxville and both majored in Finance.  Dave made a fortune in real estate, which was exactly my life plan.  Dave lives in my hometown.  If I wanted to, I could go to church with him.  I know how to get to Financial Peace Plaza without looking it up on Google Maps.  And like Dave is doing now, I had hoped to get rich and also find a way to help people (especially low and middle income people) manage their money.  Dave and I are also both fluent in sarcasm.  God however, called me in a different direction.

But there is something else besides.  Dave taps into something that I think is at least part of why Grace reacted so strongly, and also something that is often misunderstood or misinterpreted.  Dave understands, like Grace understands, and like I understand that there is a kind of poverty of spirit that traps people in a pernicious web.  He and she and I understand that a person can be so degraded, worn out, and worn down by their circumstances – whether circumstance of financial mismanagement, of family history, of abuse, of dysfunction – that ALL your sense of personal agency is destroyed. You feel powerless, hopeless, trapped, scared.

And then someone like Dave Ramsey comes along and meets you, as Dave says, ‘eyeball to eyeball’, and tells you the hard truth, ‘Yep you screwed up.  Yep, someone else messed you up.  Yep, the system is stacked against you. Yep, that was a stupid decision.  But you know what? You don’t have to live there.  There is a better option. YOU have power.  YOU have choices.  YOU have agency.

And the sarcasm?  The snarkiness?  It shocks your system.  It shocks you because almost all the people who have come to help you before don’t talk like that.  They listen to you, let you cry on their shoulder, sympathise with you, and agree with you that, yeah you were done wrong, and that’s about it.  Why isn’t Dave more sympathetic?  He’s so mean, etc., etc.

And then after you get over the shock at his approach, and the anger, and the frustration, and poking out your lip, you realize he’s right. That while you can’t do everything, you can do something.  You realize that your life really doesn’t have to be one of failure, of despair, of constrained choices, of inevitability, of abuse, of dysfunction.  And you wipe your tears, and you start where you are.  And people like Dave and Grace and others hold your trembling hand and walk you through it.  It’s ain’t about getting rich.

If you’ve never been there, or you don’t personally know people who live there, you probably have a hard time understanding that. I know those people. Some of them are my relatives.  People who take their children on vacation only to come back to the lights being shut off.  People who are afraid to answer the phone because of debt collectors hounding them.  People who have never known what it is to have money left over at the end of the month or to have a savings account with more than the $25 minimum required to keep it open.  People who make enough, but never have enough and so spend recklessly because they figure that they never will have anything so they may as well enjoy life while they can.  Or so that they can forget.

I’m not sure folks like RHE who so easily critique Ramsey understand really what it feels like to live in a world where money is your master and not your servant.  Where prosperity preaching is appealing in exactly the same way that the lottery is: because it offers a false hope.  Where you are enslaved to habits of materialism and consumerism and yet you are afraid to even open your bank statement, much less reconcile your check book.  Where debt collectors hound you morning and night for money that you have no idea how to pay back.  Where the biblical statement that the borrower is slave to the lender doesn’t feel at all theoretical, but real.

The thing is, Dave Ramsey doesn’t have to do what he does.  He’s rich.  He’s a financial whiz.  He’s made money, lost money, and made it again in real estate.  He doesn’t need this gig. And he understands that it isn’t really about money anyway, because the ‘only way to have real financial peace is to walk daily with the Prince of Peace, Christ Jesus our Lord.’