On the Complementarity of the Sexes

“For the man is not of the woman: but the woman of the man. Neither was the man created for the woman; but the woman for the man.  Nevertheless neither is the man without the woman, neither the woman without the man, in the Lord. For as the woman is of the man, even so is the man also by the woman” 1 Corinthians 11. 8-9, 10-11.

Of late, long simmering issues connected with the relationship between of men and women within the context of American Evangelicalism have become more of a slow boil.  The lines have long since been drawn between what is termed ‘Complementarianism’ and ‘Egalitarianism’ with each camp of Evangelicals planting their hermeneutical flags and rallying their troops to their preferred approach. Usually people who disagree on these issues are willing to be charitable to those who disagree. This post is not about the respective merits of each of these positions, at least not directly.  Instead I want to talk about something more basic to the whole discussion — something I think is too often lost in the terminology that has been assigned (or chosen) by the partisans of the different schools of thought.

Men and women are complementary.

Men are not women and women are not men.  This plain statement, which should seem obvious, is no longer obvious.  In an era when heteronormative cis-gendered patriarchy is regularly attacked directly by those outside the church and indirectly by those inside, this statement betrays a kind of binary approach to sex / gender that reflects my heterosexist male privilege or something like that.

Yeah.

I don’t really care.  Men and women are not the same, nor were we created to be the same.  We were created to be complementary to one another.

Complementarity is a term that has unfortunately been swept up into the polarizing theological and doctrinal debate so much that the term itself has lost all meaning.  Really it just means that men and women are for each other.  Not in the sense of being ‘in favor of’, but in the sense of being designed or intended for the other.

The other day as I drove home I noticed some men working by the roadside.  Specifically, they were digging a drainage ditch. By hand. As traffic was backed up (as it often is) I had the chance to observe well.  I noticed the young man as he hoisted with relative ease the pick-axe straight above his head, his muscles rippling through his lithe frame as sweat poured down his back.  He brought the pick-axe down again and lifted it again in a single moment – the whole upward / downward motion taking all of 5 seconds; which means 12 times per minute.  Near him was another man, standing in the ditch shoveling, the dirt flying over his shoulder with ease.

These men will go home to a wife or a mother or sister who has also worked hard all day – washing clothes by hand, selling fruit, hawking goods on the street and hauling water to the house for cooking and bathing – who will then cook for them to eat, and probably clean up afterwards.

Hard work all around.  Of that there is no doubt.  Yet the work that each does is complementary to the other.

Ditches need to be dug and men are better suited at it than women.  Domestic tasks likewise need to be done, and although these tasks can be done by men, are more readily and easily taken up by women.  One critical reason for this is that the domestic tasks usually taken up by women are the kinds of tasks that lend themselves to multi-tasking – a critical necessity when small children appear on the scene.  After all it is much easier to wash clothes by hand and keep an eye on the children than it is to dig a drainage ditch and do the same thing.

This isn’t to say that women can’t or shouldn’t dig ditches or that men mustn’t do domestic work. Not at all.

It is simply an observation of the realities that our physicality impose on us and as I said earlier, it is only our technological sophistication that allows us to pretend otherwise.  Our physicality introduces us to something we don’t like and which continuously strive to reject and that is our limitations.  And here is where the tension of complementarity comes in for many of us.

We live in a world where we can pretend that these things don’t matter.  Complementarity is easily hidden in technologically advanced and complex societies where the differences between men and women are hidden beneath layers of labour saving devices, medical interventions, and legal constructs explicitly designed to minimize the differences.  But when these are stripped away, the differences become much more starkly evident and our need for one another emerges more clearly as well.  Here is where the profundity of the mystery of marriage comes in.

As Christians there is little controversy around affirming complementarity as it relates to the body of Christ.  We all have gifts differing, as the scripture says, and so the hand and the foot need each other.  The foot does what it does and the hand what it does and although it is possible for one to function in the place of the other it isn’t ideal.  Yet when it comes to the complementarity of men and women, of what our embodied sexually differentiated selves bring into the mystery that is our union with one another, all manner of ire is stirred.  Why is that?  Well there are lots of reasons having to do with all kinds of things but I want to highlight only one which I believe is at or near the core.

We don’t want to live in the limits of our physical nature.  We have embraced a heretical notion that what really matters is spirit and the physical is unimportant.  So our physical natures tell us nothing of the things of God — it is only the disembodied spiritual that matters and since spirits are not sexed then it is an irrelevancy to make distinctions as it relates to sex.  We are therefore not complementary to one another, but interchangeable.  We don’t need the other.

But this is a lie.  And it is a lie that is particularly appealing to women.  In fact I cannot recall any time when I’ve heard a man say ‘I don’t need a woman’, yet ‘I don’t need a man’ is a common proclamation.  Why the difference?  Well men are taught by our physical nature that women are necessary.  We all came through woman and it is impossible for us to bear children.  We know that ‘it’s not good for the man to be alone’.

The contribution of men is much more hidden and dispersed so it is not readily apparent to most women that men are necessary – especially not in a world of push button technology, sophisticated systems of electricity generation and global transport.  These systems, which are run on the backs of men digging ditches, are hidden, and make it possible for this demonic delusion to take root.

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